[Week 9] Transmedia stories: from blockbusters to hybrid and distributed content

This weeks topic will be kept brief: Transmedia storytelling through multiple media platforms. Here is a quick video to catch you up on the concept before talking about it.

If I were to say that the world’s biggest entertainment franchises gained their power by engaging in transmedia practice, I would have quite the impressive repertoire of examples to back me up. Looking up a top 10 list of the highest grossing movie franchises of all time, for example, gives me 10 franchises that have all engaged in transmedia practice at some point of time:

  • The Marvel Cinematic universe:
    • Starting out as a series of comic books, then going on to feature in graphic novels, games, a 9-billion-dollar movie franchise series, spin-off cartoons, the list goes on.
  • Harry Potter:
    • 7 books turned into 8 movies grossing over 1 billion dollars. After the book franchise was complete, the Pottermore.com website engaged the audience with more interactive short stories of the Harry Potter universe. The franchise also boasts games, theme parks, and even plays such as Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.
  • James Bond:
    • A franchise worth over 6-billion dollars, with a huge list of films, games, books and short stories set in the universe.

I could go on, but the linked article explains more than I have the time for.

ca_starchart_11-29-2016
The Star Wars universe is similarly huge and cross-media.

What makes transmedia so effective?

People love to engage with their interests, and are always wanting new ways to interact with their favourite topics and hobbies. By taking a franchise and stretching it across several different media types to engage with audiences across many different hobbies. It would allow audiences usually engaged with a single hobby to then consume content created on a different platform to enrich the experience and immerse themselves in the universe.

MeanGirls-Tribes-2
My GIFt (hah) for you this week – taking the high school tribes from Mean Girls and turning them into social media platforms.

The same theory could also be applied to social media – and is something I’d like to look at in my upcoming digital artifact. In order to boost popularity, transparency, and engagement, a business or entity can engage across multiple social media platforms; and if they are careful in curating content specifically for those platforms to avoid re-releasing the same content on each platform, they are able to boost their engagement with audiences to sell their product. For example – if you create content for Facebook, you want to avoid sharing that content an all social media platforms you are active on, so that you wouldn’t make your presence on those platforms obsolete. You would be giving a reason for your audience to engage you across multiple platforms to increase your visibility, but at the same time, you are not isolating anyone for sticking with their preferred platform.

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