Week 9: Interactive Process

This week was… Interesting.

We ended up going two completely different directions – but that’s okay. After last week, I knew that we had creative differences and the only way to get through that was to just keep working through it. I’ll go through what I had planned first, and then what we ended up going with in the end.

So after last week’s disagreement, I decided to go home and continue working down the path that we had started, with the aim of extending the work beyond what we started with. I felt that the projections were flat, and while interactive, lacked a third dimension. So I went about moving the work into an imaginary corner to turn a one-dimension work into a 3-dimensional cube-like space.

The aim was to have 3 projectors: one mounted to the roof, and two on the floor. The one on the roof would span the gap of both corners and project horizontal lines, where the two on the floor (pointed at the opposite walls so that the projections cross) would extend outwards and create a 3D effect. Artist’s impression below…

artists impression 2.jpg

I created 2 sets of animations – the arrows for the left, the right, and the lines travelling down. I’ll admit it hurt my eyes to create but it was fun to play around with. I ended up doing both colour and black and white – I think I liked the black and white more. I made up a video of how the animations would look with all the layers together (not projected).

 

Very trippy – I would have loved to have seen it projected into a corner – however we ended up having to create a contingency plan as the gallery was full and there were no corner spaces available for us to play around in (sadface).

So instead we went with the boys’ idea of creating something visual and working with optical illusions.

They liked the idea of the drawings that had another image hidden in them, and wanted to use the shadow illusion effect as an advantage to interact and interfere with the illusion itself.

This was very difficult to work with though, as the additive colour of the overlapping projections didn’t really want to work in our favour.

We tried to trouble shoot by cutting some figures from our chosen image out to overlay, but we found that it ruined the effect – so instead we kept the original image, separated the figures we liked, and then cloned in the gaps to create a complete background that we placed the figures over the top of.

In the first image above you can see the complete illusion: A moustached man created by elements of the background and the figures. In the second image I have removed 2 human figures in the foreground and cloned in the background behind them with photoshop, so that we could project these over the top. In the 3rd image we experimented with silhouetting the figures so that we could overlay the cut out images.

In this instance we ended up using the second and last pictures – although with the overlapping projections, you could still see straight through the figures. It ended up looking like this:

edited.jpg

Not what we were aiming for, but still effective. The illusion was still there and you were still able to block the two figures.

By the end of it though, we felt the effort that took to produce it outweighed the practicality and effectiveness of the work itself so we decided to brainstorm at home and see what else we could come up with.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s